The Agora's research pages are moving to ascsa.net and can be found at the following link: http://agora.ascsa.net.


[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Introduction

Classical Athens saw the rise of an achievement unparalleled in history. Perikles, Aeschylus, Sophokles, Plato, Demosthenes, Thucydides, and Praxiteles represent just a few of the statesmen and playwrights, ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: History of the Agora

The excavations of the Athenian Agora have uncovered about thirty acres on the sloping ground northwest of the Acropolis (Fig. 3). Material of all periods from the Late Neolithic to modern times has been ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Panathenaic Way

Numerous roads led in and out of the Agora square. By far the most important, however, was the broad street known as the Dromos or Panathenaic Way, the principal thoroughfare of the city (Fig. 4). It ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Altar of the Twelve Gods

Near the middle of the open square, somewhat to the north, lay the Altar of the Twelve Gods (Fig. 7), today largely hidden under the Athens–Piraeus railway (1891). A corner of the enclosure wall survives, ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Stoa of Zeus Eleutherios

Lying just south of the railroad tracks, along the west side, are the remains of the Stoa of Zeus Eleutherios (Freedom) (Figs. 8, 9). This cult of Zeus was established after the battle of Plataia in 479 ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Temple of Apollo Patroos

Next to the Stoa of Zeus at the south are the remains of a small temple of Apollo Patroos (Fatherly), so-called because he was the father of Ion, founder of the Ionian Greeks, a tribe that included the ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Hephaisteion

Overlooking the Agora from the hill to the west (Kolonos Agoraios), is the Hephaisteion, the best preserved example of a Doric temple in mainland Greece (Fig. 12). It was dedicated jointly to Hephaistos ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Tholos

The south half of the west side was given over to the major administrative buildings used to run the Athenian democracy (Fig. 14). The buildings are poorly preserved, but the identifications are secure ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Bouleuterion

Just uphill from the Tholos was the Bouleuterion, meeting place of the boule, or senate. Five hundred Athenian citizens were chosen by lot to serve for a year, and met in this building every day except ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Metroon

The Metroon served two functions; it was both a sanctuary of the Mother of the Gods and the archive building of the city, a repository of official records (Fig. 19). The present remains date to the mid-2nd ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Monument of the Eponymous Heroes

Across the street from the Metroon lie the remains of the Monument of the Eponymous Heroes (Fig. 21). When Kleisthenes created the democracy in 508/7 B.C., he assigned all the Athenians to ten newly-formed ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Boundary Stones and House of Simon the Cobbler

Inscribed marble posts were used to mark the entrances to the Agora wherever a street led into the open square. Two have been found in situ, inscribed with the simple text "I am the boundary of the Agora," ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Southwest Area

Leaving the area of the boundary stone, one can head southwest up a valley leading toward the Pnyx, meeting place of the Athenian assembly. Here are the complex remains of a residential and commercial ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Southwest Fountain House

Closer to the agora proper a row of five public buildings lined the south side of the square in the Classical period (Fig. 29, 36). They comprise several important monuments, though their state of preservation ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Aiakeion

Immediately to the east are the poor remains of a large square enclosure, open to the sky and measuring about 30 meters on a side. Built in the early 5th century, at the command of the oracle of Apollo ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: South Stoa I

Measuring some 80 meters long, South Stoa I takes up much of the south side; its eastern end is the better preserved (Figs. 31, 32). It had a double colonnade, with sixteen rooms behind. It dates to ca ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Southeast Fountain House

The slight traces just south of the Church of the Holy Apostles have been identified as the remains of an early fountain house (Figs. 33, 34). The identification is based on a large terracotta pipeline ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Mint

Just east of the fountain house lie the miserable remains of a large square building with several rooms; the northern half lies under the Church of the Holy Apostles and the Southeast Temple (Early Roman) ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Middle Stoa

The appearance of the south side of the Agora was radically changed during the 2nd century B.C. with the construction of several new buildings. This South Square, as it is called, was made up of two long ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: East Building

Running southward from the east end of the Middle Stoa is the East Building. Its eastern half takes the form of a long hall with a marble chip floor and stone slabs designed to carry wooden furniture, ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: South Stoa II

South Stoa II ran westward from the south end of the East Building, parallel to the Middle Stoa (Figs. 38, 41). Dating to the second half of the 2nd century B.C., it consisted of a single Doric colonnade ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Late Roman Fortification Wall

East of the East Building and Mint we arrive once again at the Panathenaic Way, which in this area is lined along its eastern side by a massive wall built in the 3rd century A.D. (Fig. 42). The wall was ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Library of Pantainos

Lying partially under and behind the Late Roman wall are the remains of a building identified by its inscribed marble lintel block as the Library of Pantainos, dedicated to Athena Archegetis, the emperor ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Stoa of Attalos

Lining the east side of the Agora square is the Stoa of Attalos (Fig. 47), built during the reign of Attalos II of Pergamon (159–138 B.C.), who studied in Athens under the philosopher Karneades before ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Lawcourts

Underlying the north end of the Stoa of Attalos are the slight remains of a group of buildings dating to the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. (Fig. 50). Largely open courtyards, they seem to have served as ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Odeion of Agrippa

Late in the 1st century B.C. the Athenians were given money for a new marketplace by Caesar and Augustus, and the northern half of the old Agora square was filled with two new structures, the Odeion of ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Temple of Ares

Just north of the Odeion lie the ruins of a building identified by Pausanias as a temple of Ares (Figs. 56, 57). The foundations are of Early Roman construction and date, but the marble pieces of the ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Northwest Corner and the Hermes

The area of the northwest corner is where the Panathenaic Way, leading from the main gate of Athens, the Dipylon, entered the Agora square (Figs. 58, 59). This was accordingly the appropriate place for ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Royal Stoa

On the west side, lying just south of the Panathenaic Way, are the remains of the Royal Stoa (Stoa Basileios), one of the earliest and most important of the public buildings of Athens (Figs. 61, 62) ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Stoa Poikile

Across modern Hadrian Street are the most recent excavations (2003), along the north side of the square. Here have been revealed the remains of another large stoa, identified on the basis of Pausanias ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: Church of the Holy Apostles

Several churches were removed following the excavation of the modern neighborhoods overlying the Agora. The Church of the Holy Apostles, because of its early date, was deemed worth preserving and, indeed, ...

[Website]  Agora Short Guide: History of the Excavations

Some of the Agora monuments have never been fully buried and were explored by the Archaeological Society starting in the 19th century: the Stoa of Attalos (1859–1862, 1874, and 1898–1902), the Giants ...

[Object]  BI 728: Bone Button

Intact. Button-like object but hole not pierced through. A couple of grooves and ridges near edge; also around "hole". On undersurface, groups of scratches radiating from the center. Catalogued April 1954 ...

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[Object]  I 2729: Marble Fragment

Inscribed fragment. At top of wall, as preserved, inscribed face is up; left face formed part of north face of wall. Sides dressed smooth. Dimensions are maxima visible before removal. Full width preserved; ... 11 December 1934

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[Object]  I 7039: Boundary Stone

Inscribed Agora boundary stone. Top worn smooth by traffic. Corners broken. Inscription written retrograde across top and along left side. Inscription does not cover corners, a fact perhaps indicating ... 27 July 1967

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[Object]  IL 1361: Iron Nails

Six nails. Wide flat heads, short tangs, bent. Hobnails (?) Έξι σιδηροί ήλοι. Many more nails in containers nos. 172-173, from succesive strosis. Finished House B, strosis 5, found on floor. Dec.1, 2003- ... April 1954

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[Object]  P 5117: Black Glaze Vicup with Graffito

Parts of rim missing. Restored in plaster. Similar in shape and fabric to P 5116 (Α 1038), with a similar graffito scratched through the dry glaze in the middle of the floor, as well as on the underside ... 12-15 March 1935

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[Object]  P 13429: Olpe: Inscribed

Neck, handle and much of back wall missing. Flat bottom; gently rounding sides. Above, on the shoulder, painted in the glaze, the ligature delta-epsilon. Pinkish-buff clay. Glazed. Neck glazed inside; ... 8 June 1938

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[Object]  P 22998: Black Glaze Cup Fragment with Graffiti

Kylix foot, complete except for chips; vertical face slightly concave. Glazed on top surface and on inner part of underside; a glazed line also around lower edge of vertical face. Inscribed both on top ... 10 April 1953

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[Object]  S 399: Base with Relief of Charioteer, Warrior ...

The base has been hacked away on top and in the back; great, rough cuttings extend from the central rectangular cutting on the top, presumably made when the base was first cut, to support what ever stood ... 4th c. B.C.